2008 is nearly over, and it's time to take a look at what happened over the year, as well as to take a peek at the the coming 2009. A year ago I made a guess that social networking services would open up and start sharing their profiles – well, practically everyone but Facebook are doing some of that, and Facebook is trying to get everyone to depend on them – not that “create dependency” isn't a part of Google's and MySpace's plan, too. Unfortunately, we haven't yet found a meaningful way for Habbo to participate in this festival, due to differences in demographies, interest areas, and the priority of running a profitable business, instead. Still looking for that solution, though.

I also guessed that productivity applications would seriously move to the cloud – and was a bit too optimistic on that one. Sure, the applications are there, but I don't really see any of them having replaced the desktop-based counterparts – nor do I see that happening next year, either. People are, rightly so, focused somewhere else, and while over the long run moving off to the cloud will make sense from both productivity and cost standpoint, it's still too much of a jump, and too expensive to make.

The increasing popularity of netbooks, Internet access via 3G networks, etc, will have an impact on that, though. Perhaps we'll all move out to the net in a completely different way: not via our old productivity apps, but via entirely new class of applications. Something else than Facebook and Twitter though, I hope.

What else? MySQL was acquired by Sun, and we're all still waiting for the next step. The Register (I can't believe I keep reading it) has somehow gotten the impression that Sun has slowed MySQL down – nah, it's been this slow for at least three times that long. Fortunately, the acquisition may have been a catalyst for the MySQL developer community to start doing something else instead of waiting, and I'm really looking forward to the improvements Percona and Drizzle are making to keep MySQL competitive. As for Sun – time to stop confusing a good thing with dubious business models and bad release engineering before you lose all your customers, I'd say. At the same time, I'm also super-interested in the stuff Sun is doing on the hardware side of database storage with SSD-optimized solutions. Can't say I paid much attention to Sun there for a while, but they're making what seems like an unlikely comeback.

For Habbo, we've continued making progress on the track chosen late 2007 – revolutionary changes made incrementally. Biggest one this year, the free second currency of Pixels, was just launched a month ago. Several improvements are coming up for that, of course, and a whole lot of other stuff is in the works, or at least being thought of. We're trying not to hold anything longer than it absolutely needs to, so everything radically new continues to be launched sort-of unfinished and get improved along the way. It just ends up being so much better that way, as the feedback makes a significant contribution to the overall design.

This a weird time. The world is reeling from what indeed may be the worst economic crisis in 75 years (though I'm not well versed enough in history to be able to tell myself), and still (or because of it?), opportunities lie all around, ignored by most. It's never easy to tell which direction is most promising, but now I'm finding it incredibly hard to choose and prioritize between the possible things to focus on. Still, 2009 is definitely going to be a year to really focus on even fewer things than usual, and really kick ass on those.

If you made it this far, thanks for reading. I wish you a great year 2009, whatever it is you're doing.